Fresh ginger root

Picture of fresh ginger

Ginger is a medicinal herb used in cooking for centuries. In many communities it’s a sacred food, however the medicinal aspects of ginger are so powerful it’s eyebrow raising. Ginger warms up the digestive tract but contains nutritive properties that create true medicinal support. In some studies dried ginger was found most useful while others found the different elements of ginger were most supportive. Young ginger is more tender while older ginger is extremely fibrous and more difficult to digest. 


Generally ginger in the store is treated with anti growth factors, preventing it from sprouting which is how new ginger is grown. The most powerful food sources are picked fresh and used for cooking. The longer it sits on the shelf, the more the nutritive properties decrease. Seeing these beneficial aspects of ginger make it a food which shouldn’t be overlooked. 

PLOS One, a peer reviewed open access journal, found ginger, especially dried ginger, to induce cell death in breast cancer. 

The International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition found the prokinetic aspects of ginger to be shocking. They compared different test animals and found the, ” Spasmogenic effect in isolated guinea-pig ileum with 8-50 times more potency than in rabbit jejunum and ileum and rat stomach fundus and ileum.”

The World Journal of Gastroenterology reported a study which found, “We demonstrated that ginger increased the rate of gastric emptying in patients with functional dyspepsia when compared to placebo.”

Digestive Diseases in Sciences reported a study that showed ginger relieved indigestion with specific support to the upper abdomen area including bloating, discomfort, nausea, and burping.

The International Journal of Preventive Medicine reported a study which found ginger to have anticancer potential. They said, “It also has anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative properties for controlling the process of aging. Furthermore, it has antimicrobial potential as well which can help in treating infectious diseases. Generation of free radicals or reactive oxygen species during metabolism beyond the antioxidant capacity of a biological system results in oxidative stress, which plays an essential role in heart diseases, neurodegenerative diseases, cancer, and in the aging process. The bioactive molecules of ginger like gingerols have shown antioxidant activity in various modules.”

*Nourishing Plot is written by Becky Plotner, ND, traditional naturopath, CGP, D.PSc. who sees clients in Rossville, Georgia. She is a Board Certified Naturopathic Doctor, through The American Naturopathic Medical Association and works as a Certified GAPS Practitioner who sees clients in her office, Skype and phone. She has been published in Wise Traditions, spoken at two Weston A. Price Conferences, Certified GAPS Practitioner Trainings, has been on many radio shows, television shows and writes for Nourishing Plot. She serves on the GAPS Board of Directors and has recently been named “The GAPS Expert” by Dr. Natasha and will serve teaching other Certified GAPS Practitioners proper use of the GAPS protocol. Since her son was delivered from the effects of autism (Asperger’s syndrome), ADHD, bipolar disorder/manic depression, hypoglycemia and dyslexia, through food, she continued her education specializing in Leaky Gut and parasitology through Duke University, finishing with distinction. She is a Chapter Leader for The Weston A. Price Foundation. becky.nourishingplot@hotmail.com

“GAPS™ and Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ are the trademark and copyright of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. The right of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Patent and Designs Act 1988.

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One Response to Ginger Shows Shocking Medicinal Support

  1. KDKH says:

    I’ve read about the healing power of ginger many times, but it always upsets my stomach. My oldest daughter experiences the same thing. Ginger tea? Can’t drink it. Ginger candies? Can’t eat them. Ground up ginger isn’t a problem, but anything with a larger quantity is a problem. Any ideas why?

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