Ginger is one of the most powerful natural foods for prokinetic use, reactivating the migrating motor complex, a wave like wand motion in the small intestines which moves yeasts and bacteria out of the small intestines and into the large intestines for elimination. When pathogens migrate back up into the small intestines, they can reek havoc. For folks in this situation, their intestines are simply not moving food through the tract. Instead, it’s sitting there. As it sits, yeasts come to clean them up, as they are the housekeepers. This can cause severe bloating, weight gain that doesn’t budge, constipation, diarrhea, abdominal discomfort, severe food intolerances, belching, nutritional deficiencies and more. It’s a miserable situation that is both frustrating and humiliating. 

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Most GAPS folks experience SIBO symptoms. 

It is not uncommon to have severe bloating to the point where the person takes on the appearance of a human sack of potatoes resting on legs. Often times the person begins to eat less and less thinking it will help them lose the added weight. They begin to exercise to the extreme and neither help, they just keep having issues with not tolerating foods and weight gain. It is common for people in this situation to be eating a quarter cup of real food a day while exercising for hours, yet they continue to grow in size.

If you feel you have a medical condition, it’s important to visit your medical doctor. 

The International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition says, “Ginger extract (Zo.Cr), which tested positive for saponins, terpenes, phenols, flavonoids and alkaloids, showed a spasmogenic effect in isolated guinea-pig ileum with 8-50 times more potency than in rabbit jejunum and ileum and rat stomach fundus and ileum.”

The World Journal of Gastroenterology reported a study on ginger which found, “Ginger stimulated gastric emptying and antral contractions in patients with functional dyspepsia, but had no impact on gastrointestinal symptoms or gut peptides.”

Digestive Diseases and Sciences reported a study saying, “Ginger (rhizome of Zingiber officinale) has been widely used for centuries in gastrointestinal disorders, particularly dyspepsia, but its precise mode of action has yet to be elucidated. This study was undertaken to study the prokinetic action of ginger and its possible mechanism of action. These data indicate that Zo.Cr contains a cholinergic, spasmogenic component evident in stomach fundus preparations which provides a sound mechanistic insight for the prokinetic action of ginger. In addition, the presence of a spasmolytic constituent(s) of the calcium antagonist type may explain its use in hyperactive states of gut like colic and diarrhea.”

Veterinary Research Forum reported a study using ginger extract and how it affects smooth muscle activity in sheep reticulum and rumen. They found, “The studies on the prokinetic effects of ginger and the results of our study provide evidence that ginger having gastrointestinal properties such as a potential to stimulate the reticuloruminal contractions could be used in treatment of reticuloruminal hypomotility in ruminants.”

Some people see great success in using Molitpro, a ginger capsule that is meant for healthy gut motility. These ginger snaps can be used in the same way to increase motility. These ginger snaps have a lot of ginger in them and are hot. They should not be given to a child in the same manner of giving any other cookie.

To make these zingy Ginger Snaps:

Mix together 1.5 cups pastured butter and a half cup local honey until frothy, about 15 minutes. 

Add in one cup powdered ginger, 4 teaspoons vanilla, 3 cups of almond flour, 1/2 a cup of coconut flour and 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon and mix until blended.

Drop on a non-aluminum cookie sheet covered in parchment paper and press flat or squeeze out of a decorative tip bag. Cook at 350 degrees for 14 minutes or until cooked with browned edges. 

 

Stored in sealed containers. As they sit out, they acquire moisture and become less snappy. 

Ginger Snaps to support SIBO - A GAPS Treat
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Ingredients
  1. 1.5 cups pastured butter
  2. 1/2 cup local honey
  3. 1 cup powdered ginger
  4. 4 teaspoons vanilla
  5. 3 cups almond flour
  6. 1/2 cup coconut flour
  7. 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
Instructions
  1. Mix together 1.5 cups pastured butter and a half cup local honey until frothy, about 15 minutes.
  2. Add in one cup powdered ginger, 4 teaspoons vanilla, 3 cups of almond flour, 1/2 a cup of coconut flour and 1 teaspoon of ground cinnamon and mix until blended.
  3. Drop on a cookie sheet covered in parchment paper and press flat or squeeze out of a decorative tip bag. Cook at 350 degrees for 14 minutes or until cooked with browned edges.
Nourishing Plot https://www.nourishingplot.com/

*Nourishing Plot is written by Becky Plotner, ND, traditional naturopath, CGP, D.PSc. who sees clients in Rossville, Georgia. She is a Board Certified Naturopathic Doctor, through The American Naturopathic Medical Association and works as a Certified GAPS Practitioner who sees clients in her office, Skype and phone. She has been published in Wise Traditions, spoken at two Weston A. Price Conferences, Certified GAPS Practitioner Trainings, has been on many radio shows, television shows and writes for Nourishing Plot. Since her son was delivered from the effects of autism (Asperger’s syndrome), ADHD, bipolar disorder/manic depression, hypoglycemia and dyslexia, through food, she continued her education specializing in Leaky Gut and parasitology through Duke University, finishing with distinction. She is a Chapter Leader for The Weston A. Price Foundation. becky.nourishingplot@hotmail.com

“GAPS™ and Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ are the trademark and copyright of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. The right of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Patent and Designs Act 1988.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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