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It was recently reported that sauerkraut topped the charts of probiotics, surpassing that of over-the -counter probiotics purchased.


Dr. Mercola sent his sauerkraut off to a lab and reported the findings of probiotics saying, “We had it analyzed. We found in a 4-6 ounce serving of the fermented vegetables there were literally ten trillion bacteria.” That means 2 ounces of home fermented sauerkraut had more probiotics than a bottle of 100 count probiotic capsules. Translated this means one 16 ounce of sauerkraut is equal to 8 bottles of probiotics.

He says there’s two ways a lab can analyze the microbial presence in the sauerkraut,”One is to measure the quantity of bacteria growing and then the more expensive process is to speciate the different types of bacteria. We’re in the process of doing that now.”

In The Gluten Summit, 2013, Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD, told Dr. Tom O’Bryan, ““With every mouthful of sauerkraut you’re consuming billions of beneficial microbes which will be killing the pathogens in your gut driving them out and replenishing the beneficial flora in your digestive tract.”

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The probiotic count of store-bought, shelf stable sauerkraut does not compare to home-brewed sauerkraut. Click here to learn how to make your own. Click here to learn how to make sauerkraut at home and here to learn how to make kraut juice, a more gentle on the stomach probiotic for those with leaky gut. People who do have unbalanced gut flora with an overpopulation of bad gut bacteria pathogens experience die-off symptoms such as diarrhea, rash, cold-like symptoms, flu-like symptoms, etc. Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride recommends starting with one teaspoon and looking for die-off symptoms then gradually increasing the amount daily or weekly depending on what your body can handle. To read more click here. To see another test on mice with sauerkraut click here.

Die off symptoms are accompanied with inflammation. Healing and inflammation do not go hand in hand. It is important to keep inflammation down so healing can take place therefore it is important to keep the amount of die off down to just below a noticeable state.

vi.wikipedia.org

vi.wikipedia.org

Cabbage is high in anti-inflammatory properties, vitamins A and C. Cabbage also reduces lipids in the bloodstream. When cabbage is fermented into sauerkraut the fermentation process opens up the cell walls accessing a higher ratio of vitamins. It has been said that sauerkraut has 200 times more vitamin C than the head of cabbage before fermentation.

The African Journal of Science and Research (AJSR) said, “Healthy colons of humans contain some beneficial bacteria which feed on digestive wastes, thereby producing lactic acid. Without these beneficial bacteria, the digestive tracts become a thriving zone for DSC04298pathogenic bacteria and yeasts, resulting in candidiasis. However, it is suggested that the consumption of lacto-fermented sauerkraut could help re-establish lactobacilli.”

Bacteria in your body outnumber your cells by about 10 to 1.

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD, author GAPS (affiliate link) says 90% of our body is made up of microbes.

In 1807 French psychiatrist Phillipe Pinel said, “The primary seat of insanity generally is in the region of the DSC04295stomach and intestines.” Pinel is known as the father of modern psychiatry and came to this quote after working with mental patients for many years.

Sauerkraut is high in tyrosine, an amino acid that affects many aspects of the body including blood pressure regulation and dopamine. To learn how to make your own sauerkraut in three easy steps click here.

*Nourishing Plot is written by Becky Plotner, ND, traditional naturopath, CGP, D.PSc. who sees clients in Rossville, Georgia. She works as a Certified GAPS Practitioner who sees clients in her office, Skype and phone. She has been published in Wise Traditions, spoken at two Weston A. Price Conferences, Certified GAPS Practitioner Trainings, has been on many radio shows, television shows and writes for Nourishing Plot. Since her son was delivered from the effects of autism (Asperger’s syndrome), ADHD, bipolar disorder/manic depression, hypoglycemia and dyslexia, through food, she continued her education specializing in Leaky Gut and parasitology through Duke University, finishing with distinction. She is a Chapter Leader for The Weston A. Price Foundation. becky.nourishingplot@hotmail.com

“GAPS™ and Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ are the trademark and copyright of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. The right of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Patent and Designs Act 1988.

Sauerkrat contains large amounts of tyramine.  Tyramine is neurotransmitter releasing agent.  In other words, it’s a chemical that induces the release of feel good brain chemicals.  This includes our friend, dopamine! – See more at: http://www.oysterbed7.com/2012/07/oysters-and-sauerkraut.html#sthash.tIQKHwB4.dpuf

 

Sauerkrat contains large amounts of tyramine.  Tyramine is neurotransmitter releasing agent.  In other words, it’s a chemical that induces the release of feel good brain chemicals.  This includes our friend, dopamine! – See more at: http://www.oysterbed7.com/2012/07/oysters-and-sauerkraut.html#sthash.tIQKHwB4.dpuf

Sauerkrat contains large amounts of tyramine.  Tyramine is neurotransmitter releasing agent.  In other words, it’s a chemical that induces the release of feel good brain chemicals.  This includes our friend, dopamine! – See more at: http://www.oysterbed7.com/2012/07/oysters-and-sauerkraut.html#sthash.tIQKHwB4.dpuf

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98 Responses to Sauerkraut Test Divulges Shocking Probiotic Count

  1. Denis says:

    Late to this one, but is there ANY information on how many of the fermented bacteria actually make it past the upper stomach acids and into the lower intestinal tract, etc. . .?

    Thanks.

    • Fuller says:

      That’s what has drawn me to this conversation, again. I’m curious as to how much pro-biotic survives stomach acid.
      Obviously not all is destroyed. Is any even destroyed?

      • Becky Plotner says:

        in order to have disease you have inflammation and a reduction in stomach acid. this creates a downward spiral with the end results being and auto-immune disease. these people create so little stomach acid on their own that they have overactive stomach acid to compensate – this results in GERD, burping, hiccups, stomach acid buildup, etc. these individuals respond very well on digestive enzymes: HCL and pepsin like this one: (http://www.amazon.com/Doctors-Best-Betaine-Capsules-120-Count/dp/B000NRTXGW/ref=as_sl_pc_ss_til?tag=nourishingp0c-20&linkCode=w01&linkId=FJNB7VND3R5RSQZE&creativeASIN=B000NRTXGW) it produces the stomach acid that your body was ceasing to produce, this helps aid in digesting food. if you have disease of any sort your stomach acid is compormised and the probiotic foods being killed by stomach acid is a non-issue. people that are considered canary-in-the-coalmines, those who eat food-ish items and get sick immediately from the fact that it is not nourishing food tell you that sauerkrauts, kim chi, kefir, yogurt, etc are all highly beneficial to their systems. this is evident through their behavior, their transit time and the end-product in the toilet.

  2. Joe Parrigen says:

    Great article. Its sad how so many medicines that can help us can be found right in our kitchen or garden but so many Americans are drowning in medical debt.

  3. […] ate but thankfully my palate has changed.  Fermented sauerkraut contains a lot of the same healthy probiotics as a bowl of […]

  4. […] Plot. She has several articles and studies about the benefits of sauerkraut. This one, about the shocking amount of probiotics in sauerkraut, is my favorite, and contains links to other great information. Fermented? Like beer? Do I need a […]

  5. […] salt and a carefully controlled fermentation process, and suddenly the humble cabbage becomes a fantastic source of probiotics that help to keep your whole body healthy. It’s even used for cancer prevention. Get an enhanced […]

  6. […] Leave a reply Sauerkraut Test Divulges Shocking Probiotic Count […]

  7. […] In The Gluten Summit, 2013, Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD, told Dr. Tom O’Bryan, ““With eve… […]

  8. […] is an article I found recently that shows 2 ounces of home-made sauerkraut can have more probiotics than a […]

  9. ShawnDiggs says:

    Why do people keep spreading the myth that sauerkraut has a higher Vitamin C content than cabbage? Every nutrition site that provides nutrient breakdowns of food items consistently shows that sauerkraut is lower in Vitamin C than cabbage.

    • Becky Plotner says:

      It is my understanding the cabbage used, organic, gmo, pasteurization, etc makes a difference.

    • Norm says:

      Body ecology site says otherwise:

      Sauerkraut: A Superior Source of Vitamin C

      Raw cabbage on its own already contains moderate amounts of vitamin C—around 30 mg per cup.

      When you ferment cabbage into sauerkraut, its vitamin C and antioxidant levels skyrocket. (4)

      According to researchers at Cornell University, levels of antioxidants and vitamin C in sauerkraut range from 57 to 695 mg—with raw, fermented red cabbage having the highest levels of vitamin C, hitting almost 700 mg per cup.

      Besides boasting high levels of vitamin C, sauerkraut also contains other antioxidants that protect against stress and fight disease. The beneficial probiotics in sauerkraut inoculate the gut and further fortify the immune system. Sauerkraut and other raw, fermented foods made with cabbage, like Kimchi, are true superfoods that have a long history of protecting the body when resources were scarce.

      • Pia Curtis says:

        I agree with Shawn Diggs above.

        The devil is in the detail or the logic … lol!

        One cup of raw cabbage contains x, y .z .. etc.

        That same one cup of cabbage becomes around one quarter (approx) cup of sauerkraut, due to extraction of liquid from the brine plus the fermentation process so….. one quarter cup of sauerkraut has the same nutritional value as say, one cup of cabbage.

        Its like comparing fresh fruit to dried or tomato paste or sauce to fresh tomatoes or fruit to fruit juice. Or yoghurt to greek yoghurt (which is regular yoghurt minus the whey)

        The sauerkraut is concentrated. Nothing miraculous occurs to mysteriously increase the nutritional content, other than the immense multiplication of bacteria to provide probiotic value to the fermented vegetable in question.

        As its been a while since I mad sauerkraut so if the conversion is 1 cup cabbage to one half cup sauerkraut, the principle is the same.

  10. […] own kraut (all good things to know when considering adding fermented foods to your diet) — the consensus seems to be in favor of fermented foods for their probiotic and anti-cancer promise. Here’s an article that touts the […]

  11. Leanne Martin says:

    A good read, thak you. Does anyone know if the probiotics survive ‘normal’ cooking temperatures, please?

  12. […] with Vitamins C and K and has an astonishing amount of probiotics per serving.  Two ounces of home-fermented sauerkraut had more probiotics than a bottle of 100 count probiotic capsules. Translated, this means a mere […]

  13. Mike says:

    Do you put the lids on loosely or tightly?

    • Becky Plotner says:

      I’ve done both. Not too tight but not tight with the quarter turn back like if I’m canning. I generally just put them on, don’t give it much thought.

  14. […] the probiotic capsules because the king of probiotics is here. Sauerkraut is bursting with good bacteria cultures and can help restore and grow your […]

  15. Teresa says:

    We have always cooked our sauerkraut, how does this affect the probiotic numbers?

    • Becky Plotner says:

      Heat kills the probiotic factor. You still have good enzymes there so it’s still beneficial, just different.

  16. […] and textures that add variety and deliciousness to your diet. They’re also a delicious and cheap source of trillions of beneficial bacterial that aid […]

  17. […] Surkål innehåller mer Probiotika […]

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