Fermented beans provide beneficial flora to the microbiome that can not be provided from any other food. The benefits are numerous. Fermenting beans is a traditional practice in Asian countries, specifically in the form of natto and tempeh. Different beans give different probiotic strains. 

Frontiers In Microbiology says, “Functional properties of microorganisms in fermented foods include probiotics properties, antimicrobial properties, antioxidant, peptide production, fibrinolytic activity, poly-glutamic acid, degradation of antinutritive compounds.”

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Plant Foods For Human Nutrition says when fermenting beans, “Antinutrients, HCN, oxalate, and theobromine decreased with increasing duration of fermentation.”

Some say, the way to tell if your body needs it, try it. If you love it, are attracted to it, you’re body needs it. 

Fermented beans are usually referred to as bean paste. It is made by taking dry navy beans and soaking them in water with a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar, with the mother. After 24 hours, rinse, then repeating the soaking process for four days. After properly soaking and rinsing the beans, for every two and a half cups of prepared beans mix three tablespoon of chopped onions and one tablespoon chopped garlic together with three bay leaves and two teaspoons of mineral salt and two teaspoons of home fermented and strained whey. Pack the ingredients in a quart mason jar, leaving one inch headroom. Put the lid on and let it sit tight on the counter, or in a cabinet, for three to five days, depending on the temperature in your kitchen. 

This delicious treat goes fast!

Fermented Beans - GAPS Approved
A fermented food that the family will fight for and love.
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Ingredients
  1. One bag dried navy beans
  2. Apple Cider Vinegar
  3. Bay leaves
  4. Onion
  5. Garlic
  6. salt and pepper
Instructions
  1. Soak beans in water with a tablespoon of apple cider vinegar, with the mother for 24 hours. Rinse, then repeat the soaking process each day for four days. After properly soaking and rinsing the beans, for every two and a half cups of prepared beans mix three tablespoon of chopped onions and one tablespoon chopped garlic together with three bay leaves and two teaspoons of mineral salt and two teaspoons of home fermented and strained whey. Pack the ingredients in a quart mason jar, leaving one inch headroom. Put the lid on and let it sit tight on the counter, or in a cabinet, for three to five days, depending on the temperature in your kitchen.
Adapted from Nourishing Traditions
Adapted from Nourishing Traditions
Nourishing Plot http://www.nourishingplot.com/
*Nourishing Plot is written by Becky Plotner, ND, traditional naturopath, CGP, D.PSc. who sees clients in Rossville, Georgia. She works as a Certified GAPS Practitioner who sees clients in her office, Skype and phone. She has been published in Wise Traditions, spoken at two Weston A. Price Conferences, Certified GAPS Practitioner Trainings, has been on many radio shows, television shows and writes for Nourishing Plot. Since her son was delivered from the effects of autism (Asperger’s syndrome), ADHD, bipolar disorder/manic depression, hypoglycemia and dyslexia, through food, she continued her education specializing in Leaky Gut and parasitology through Duke University, finishing with distinction. She is a Chapter Leader for The Weston A. Price Foundation. becky.nourishingplot@hotmail.com

“GAPS™ and Gut and Psychology Syndrome™ are the trademark and copyright of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride. The right of Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride to be identified as the author of this work has been asserted by her in accordance with the Copyright, Patent and Designs Act 1988.

 

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6 Responses to Fermented Beans – GAPS Approved

  1. Ruth says:

    Love it! Gonna make this asap! I’ve soaked and sprouted beans before, but never fermented with other additions. Sounds delicious!

  2. Jennifer Bayard says:

    Do I have to use whey, or would kefir work as well? Thanks for the great recipes!

  3. Wayne says:

    What does soaking “with the mother” mean?

    • Becky Plotner says:

      Apple Cider Vinegar, with the mother, is raw live Apple Cider Vinegar. It is linked in the post where the Apple Cider Vinegar is printed in blue prior to the
      “with the mother” text.

  4. Bokashi paul says:

    Kefir is one of the most effective ways to start a culture. Limbaugh types of products will give you more of a vinegary type of fermentation.

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