Exposing the egg to Lactobacillus crispatus during in vitro fertilization ensured a higher likelihood of egg implantation says surgeon of vascular cancer Leonard Smith, MD. “The likelihood that embryo can then be implanted and survive goes up. Bottom line, Lactobacillus on the egg helped in vitro fertilization success.”

Colonizing the vaginal area with the Lactobacillus crispatus proved beneficial.

Studies further showed men who were put on probiotics to establish beneficial strains of bacteria in the gut showed a higher sperm count, a higher count of sertoli cells which are responsible for testosterone levels, elevated testosterone, and more vigorous ejaculum.

Dr. Smith said, “Mixed vaginoses that don’t have a dominant strain do not seem to respond well to antibiotics. But guess what they do respond well to? Probiotics and a probiotic diet which is a plant-based diet. In addition to that, you can take fermented milk in a fermented solutions of bacteria, instill it inter-vaginally and switch them to a healthier vaginal profile, which needs to be done in the first trimester.”

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He adds that an environment high in Lactobacillus showed less likelihood for a miscarriage or premature delivery. Group B strep was also knocked out with high applications of Lactobacillus. Dr. Smith recommends women to lubricate their feminine zones with Lactabacillus.

Group B strep left untreated could result in mental retardation or even death. Delivery room doctors don’t really have a choice legally when a delivering mother tests positive for Group B strep even though only 20% of cases are pathogenic and only 2% result in death.

PeerJComputerScience.com says, “Evidence indicates that the intestinal microbiota regulates our physiology and metabolism.”

The NIH says, “We have found that the dietary supplementation of aged mice with the probiotic bacterium Lactobacillus reuteri makes them appear to be younger than their matched untreated sibling mice.”



Science Domain International studied Lactobacillus and fertility specifically with E. coli strains saying, “Upon mating and completion of gestation period 100% fertility was observed with 108c.f.u./20µl L. plantarum and 102 c.f.u/20µl E. coli, whereas 100% females were infertile when administered with 106 c.f.u/20µl of E. coli along with 108c.f.u./20µl L. plantarum and only 50% fertility outcome was observed with 104 c.f.u/20µl E. coli.”

Natural Fertility Info says, “Many natural fertility experts agree; probiotic supplementation should be a part of regular protocol when treating infertility. Low gut flora gives rise to inflammatory disease. Endometriosis, PCOS, uterine fibroids, adenomyosis, dysmenorrhea (painful menstruation), Hashimoto’s thyroiditis and autoimmune related infertility issues all have a common element involved: chronic inflammation. Inadequate levels of gut flora also give rise to the most common female vaginal problem: yeast infection.”

The NIH reported a study on endometriosis in rats. They administered Lactobacillus gasseri and saw, “Complete healing was observed in two of nine rats, but in none of the control group. These findings suggest that (Lactobacillus gasseri) is useful not only in therapy of pre-existing endometriosis but also in the prevention of the growth of endometrial tissue.”



Two years prior the NIH found in a different study of 66 people, “In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of Lactobacillus gasseri OLL2809 on endometriosis by the randomized, double-blind and placebo-controlled clinical study, especially against pain, which is one of the causative factors to decrease the quality of life. Results show that the tablet containing L. gasseri OLL2809 is effective on endometriosis, especially against menstrual pain and dysmenorrhea. Moreover, it was found that the tablet has no adverse effects. Therefore, it was suggested that the tablet containing L. gaserri OLL2809 contributes to improve the quality of life in the patients with endometriosis.”

The NIH reported another study on male fertility in regard to seminal fluid saying, “The analysis results showed seminal bacteria community types were highly associated with semen health. Lactobacillus might not only be a potential probiotic for semen quality maintenance, but also might be helpful in countering the negative influence of Prevotella and Pseudomonas. In this study, we investigated whole seminal bacterial communities and provided the most comprehensive analysis of the association between bacterial community and semen quality. The study significantly contributes to the current understanding of the etiology of male fertility.”



Smith says it does help taking fermented foods and probiotics before and during pregnancy and they are not finding many studies showing there is any danger.

Donna Gates, author of Body Ecology, has been seeing significant benefits for years giving babies probiotics from fermented foods right from birth.

Dr. Natasha Campbell-McBride, MD, neurosurgeon, neurologist and author of GAPS, says women who lather their vaginal areas with home-brewed sour cream, yogurt and kefir see amazing results with healthy children birthed through the canal. The beneficial probiotic strains creep up the vaginal canal and support the ecosystem with beneficial bacteria. Dr. Natasha says this will benefit reoccurring UTIs or yeast issues as well as benefiting the baby. She is considered by many as the pioneer in reestablishing the microbiome in the most drastic health issues. Her findings were published in 2001.

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*Nourishing Plot is written by a mom whose son has been delivered from the effects of autism (asperger’s syndrome), ADHD, bipolar disorder/manic depression, hypoglycemia and dyslexia through food. This is not a news article published by a paper trying to make money. This blog is put out by a mom who sees first hand the effects of nourishing food vs food-ish items. No company pays her for writing these blogs, she considers this a form of missionary work. It is her desire to scream it from the rooftops so that others don’t suffer from the damaging effect of today’s “food”.




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